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paris couture. eglin said this young man looking very serious as he sits -- you will see this young man looking very serious as he sits and you will realize this is not a miracle. there was a solid basis. the other thing i want to say is that, you know, they're not many designers are around here changed the course of history. because when it comes to fashion, yes, there are lots of things that we see. lots of excitement, lots of fralala going on, but we do not often see things that you realize have captured the moment in time. and that is what i think you'll find in this exhibition. but i do not want to talk anymore, because those are actually some of the believes that you have come to listen to jean paul gaultier and not suzy menkes. [laughter] so jean paul, i really wanted to ask you, thinking we're going through the exhibition from the beginning, the power you give women with the sexuality with the corsets, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kind of a reflection of what is h
of paris but not to the streets that we know that are in front of the palace but the streets with a very mixed community. in those days, even more so. and that inspired you to do collections. this was in a way breaking a parisian code, wasn't it? instead of pretending these immigrants were not there, you're actually inspired by their colors, their hair, their clothes, and you turn them into your collection. >> definitely. i was very inspired by different people always. maybe -- with me, i felt a little different. a project at school. for example, not doing football. i was more touched by people that are a little different or could be rejected. they inspire me also because i do not know it was another world. for inspiration, for example, because close very clearly, very early became my attraction -- clothes became nmy attraction, a subsection. as more attractive to addressing people than addressing myself. it was not my objective desire, my own person. so i think that if i looked, the market inspire me. people different in it the streets or inspiring me. not what was fashion. maybe i was
of the elegance of paris. and i remember that i propose -- it was the last new bid of coutoure that arrived. i thought to propose -- [unintelligible] why don't you take one designer like vivian westwood or others to make one season, one coutoure collection? >> you should call some up immediately and suggest the deal. >> [laughs] that is true. each one to make their own collection should not be back. a very attractive idea. >> as you do not want to talk about art, we will not say your work is art. let's be very vulgar and talk about money. [laughter] it is extraordinary what you have produced in coutoure. does that make any money? quick to be honest, what we produce in coutoure does not make money but it does include money. i must say, i am very proud of that. when i started to do coutoure, after a lot of stories that may be issued do another job, i said, ok, i will do my own collection. i started and never stopped after. on boat one, one woman, done all in lace in the exhibition. it starts like, ok, i did not think to make another one. so i did one after and one after and one after peter i am
regularly in london and paris. i am very happy to see that they are having this enthusiasm and interest in modernizing business, modernize and design. >> the lifestyle you are promoting is only available to a small group of very rich people. does that concern you? >> i am always ask, what do you think about promoting luxury in this expensive lifestyle? i always say that you can be stylish without buying expensive things. style is an identity on how you see yourself. in china, the model is very different. young girls today will probably be totally transformed in a month, because it is a sharply changing society. from my perspective, i do not give up on anyone. >> unusually for a publishing venture, they made a profit in the first year. there is no question that there is an appetite for the lifestyle it promotes. the challenge now is to nurture the creative talent within the country to satisfy that demand. >> that is it from beijing for now. i will be back at the same time tomorrow. of course, there is plenty of analysis on line about the once in a generation handover of power year. just
. more to the point, london out is tremendously diverse. paris is becoming in admitting that it is more a diversity, and there's a little line for me quite hidden away the says i'm very much a parisian or i'm interested in parisian women, but not quite sure that i ever met a parisian woman. what do you mean by that? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely
by 0.5%, and the cac 40 in paris gaining 0.4%. earlier, asian stock prices were mostly lower on thursday following an overnight tumble in the u.s. sentiment was weighed down heavily as investors anticipate a fiscal cliff in the u.s. tokyo's nikkei average ended 1.5% lower, extending losses to four days. south korea's kospi lost 1.1%. hong kong shares were down 2.4%. looking at currencies, the yen is keeping a firm tone against the dollar and euro. traders are buying safer currencies like the yen due to a cautious outlook for the global economy. the dollar/yen right now 79.81 po 85. the dollar is also lower against the yen, currently 101.75 to 75. many market players are on the sidelines ahead of a european bank central policy meeting later today. >>> some key japanese economic indicators came out on thursday. they all show signs of a slowdown in business activities. the current account surplus for september shrank for first time in two months. this is a broad measure of foreign trade. finance ministry officials say the account surplus stood at $6.3 billion. that's down about
a look at the major benchmarks in europe. london's ftse 100 is down by 1%. in paris the cac 40 is down by .30%. that's all now in business news. i'll leave you now with a recap of market figures. >>> clear skies in tokyo but rough weather up north. rachel ferguson has more. rachel. >> hi. we've been following a storm moving through western and northern japan. we've been seeing heavy rainfall. we could get another 80 to 100 millimeters of rain in the next 24 hours. some strong winds with that too. gusts of 90 kilometers an hour have been recorded. there was even a tornado in wakaima. we don't see them so frequently in japan, but they're certainly not completely out of the question when we have a storm like this. there's one that came down over water. quite a tight funnel cloud earlier on in the day. so these kinds of conditions are going to persist on into thursday and it should start to clear up a little bit after that. meanwhile, the continent is looking very dry. that's also going to change. we have a rain event starting to develop in central china and it will move up to the northeas
almost 0.5%, and the cac 40 in paris declining by 0.5%. meanwhile, share prices across the asian europe was lower everywhere but japan because of the expectations to reach an agreement before the fiscal cliff fades. the kospi shed 1.2%. chinese stocks extended losses after the closely watched announcement of the new leadership in the country. the shanghai composite fell 1.2%. hong kong's hang seng slipped 1.5%. let's take a look at currencies. the yen fell to its lowest level in more than six months against the dollar. the dollar/yen 81.14-18. investors feel japan's general election next month may bring in a government that will carry out more monetary easing. the euro is recovering to the 103-yen level, now at 103.58 to 61. >>> representatives from japan's farming sector rallied in tokyo. they're urging the government not to take part in talks on a free trade deal under the trans-pacific partnership. japan has been in talks with countries involved in the u.s.-led trade negotiations. about 1,500 people gathered at the rally sponsored by the central union of agricultural cooperatives. >>
a cousin who had been in the women's army corps during world war ii. and she went to paris, and she bought this painting. she is a cat lover. and she paid a few hundred dollars for it. and she was told that it was extremely valuable. and this was in the 1940s? yes, mm-hmm. and i'm not a cat lover. so it's been on my porch for 15 years. and what do you know about it? i know that he was a contemporary of toulouse-lautrec, that he was swiss, and he came to paris in 1881, and he is more noted for his posters. the artist's name is théophile steinlen. and you're absolutely right. he was a contemporary and a friend of toulouse-lautrec's, also a famous poster artist. he was born in switzerland, and in his early 20s, he moved to paris. and he's first working in paris in the 1880s as an illustrator, and soon after that as a poster artist. he did a number of images of workers, and very much had a social agenda in imaging poor people, downtrodden people. but what he's best known for are his posters of parisian nightclubs and theater programs and, of course, the beloved cats. and most of his models ar
turecamo, our man in paris. >> reporter: the latest craze in french dining. hamburger. yeah, the french used to think they were an american scourge: food without flavor or finesse. but they're beginning to see that even a hamburger can be gourmet. i mean just ask victor. he created a restaurant dedicated to the gourmet burger. he did his research criss-crossing america. >> i started in los angeles with a backpack. my only goal was to eat hamburgers. >> reporter: he had been open for a month and the wait for a table was 30 to 45 minutes. then there's another restaurant, a smoking truck. the first gourmet food truck ever in paris. the waiting time here? we're talking about a hamburger. the truck is the brain child of chris ten frederick from l.a. >> i tried to get the most authentic american burger possible. >> reporter: and the french find guilty pleasure eating with their hands. so what makes them gourmet? well, victor worked with an artisan butcher in paris. together they developed >> to get the perfect patty. reporter: chris ten studied french cuisine in paris for several years before
arrives in paris, the master who was already there, robert livingston who was approached, and he says essentially, how would you guys like to buy the entire territory of louisiana. livingston, it's not surprising, he said, yes, let's do this. they negotiate. the embassy arrives, complete the negotiation. >> host: that's james monroe. >> guest: who would become madison's secretary of state, and then would become madison's success sore as president. we have in the room a bunch of people almost who -- who would be president or almost president or thoroughly evaluated. they complete the negotiations. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they have bigger problems than they have with the united states. they want the cash. >> host: louisiana was a white elephant. >> guest: they think that the united states gets louisiana. it's too far away, and they with too consumed to protect it. he says, amazingly, with the foresight that gives him the reputation for, you know, genius of mixed ethical quality, but remarkable intellectual abilities, a says a century from now, it could make them
the board down about 1%. london ftse 100 is down about .9%. and the dax down about 1%. and in paris, the crack 40 is down by 1%. investors are becoming less willing to take risk because a decision on the bailout fund for greece has been put off till next week. in tokyo the nikkei extended losses to seven days. chinese stocks were treated because of fierce that the on going communist party congress would make little change in economic policies. let's have a look at currencies. the euro is losing ground against the yen. investors are keeping a wary eye on the debt situation in greece. the yen is quoted at 100- 75-79. >>> many countries are now seeking to diversify their energy sources. industry ministry officials in japan are aiming to launch the world's first futures trading market for liquefied natural gas. they hope to put it into effect by march 2014 to bring down lng prices. liquid natural gas prices have surged since the fukushima daiichi plant accident, it led to shutdowns of all but two reactors in the country. the commodity has been traded at a premium since the link to crude
's shares down by almost 0.7%. frankfurt the dax declining by 0.6%. in paris the cac 40 declining by 0.4%. moving on to currencies the dollar is little changed against the yen after japan's lower house was dissolved in the afternoon. the euro is fluctuating in a narrow range currently quoted at 103.32-36. >>> the new leaders of china were announced on thursday. on where the chinese economy will go from here we spoke to steven wong, an associate professor at the university of hong kong. >> i don't think there is a dramatic difference between the two in terms of economic policy. the goal is to try to achieve a reasonable economic growth as well as to balance the need of structural reform. currently the growth is moderate so i would expect the government would continue the economic reform on a very cautious manner. >> reporter: at the most recent communist party conference economic goals were set. they were a doubling in the country's gdp and average income by 2020. steven wong says it is likely to be achieved with the consecutive growth of 7% per year but the quality is important. >> bal
100 is up by about .4%. dax is also up about .4%. in paris, the cac 40 is up about .7%. market players remain cautious as they wait to see the vote by greek lawmakers on the austerity package later in the day. >>> earlier asian stock prices were mostly higher on wednesday. hong kong shares were up about .7%. singapore rose .8%. nikkei average ended marginally lower extending losses to three days. >>> finally a quick look at currencies, the dollar is gaining ground against the yen and euro on the hope that obama's re-election would help prop up the u.s. economy now exchanging hands 80.38 to 39. euro quoted at 12818 to 19. >>> a japanese government panel will draw up a timetable for overhauling the nation's power supply system by the end of this year. an industry ministry task force resumed talks on the reforms on wednesday. that's after the government came up with a new energy policy in september. the policy requires phasing out the reliance on nuclear power and greater use of green energy. under the plan households would be able to choose their power suppliers. the task force also call
be falling m middle of manhattan, london, or paris. >> and if manhattan, london, and paris were occupied and didn't have their own state, their own recognition. they would feel as they they had to fight too. >> no country no, nation, no deposit can with instanted that. we are doing everything we can. >> we saw the targeted killing of the -- that has led to what we're seeing now. are there other military leaders? are there other political leaders of hamas that are now in the crosshairs of the idf? >> i would first like to say that mr. jabri is not exactly mama theresa. the guy is a mass murderer. >> he is one of the military leaders. >> murdered women and children. >> are there others? >> people like that, when they are -- the word is a better and safer place without those people. we have better chances without people like that -- >> are there others who are being targeted as well, other leaders? >> israel will do whatever it takes to make sure that israeli civilians are not in harm's way through people whose only issue -- >> does that mean the leadership? does that mean additional target
upon itself the. >> oh those wide boulevards in paris. can we stroll them again, summer trees in bloom? will you point out your ponzi on where you stayed when a plus just a baby? we will stop for ice cream. i will choose pistachio of course for you. even at 17 how sophisticated you were with your gillian savidge. your handsome vietnamese penpal writing you said literary letters in schoolboy french. 1958 or 59, wearing black armbands, still mourning james dean. u.n. maureen sneaking cigarettes, hiking dusty piles of moody magazines under the bed. >> living in the coldwell ordered house of adult experience. >> a decade lost between us, my student years in chicago, london for nearly as long, returning to this country and 73, a year in the ozarks vi -- before he hitchhiked west. communal flats, antiwar marches, street theater collect its in arkansas, northern california. and narrative full of the usual drugs in fanciful while you are at home, a respectable cambridge wife, reading homer in the original as your toddler snapped. >> when i had young children, i found consolation, the language
. giving up some of these gains. ftse 100 up 0.4%. xetra dax half a percent. sp spain and paris in green. greek almost down 2% with greek bank stocks leading the way lower. dallas fisher said the u.s. central bank must set limits on its monetary policy. the hawkish fisher warned the size of the fed asset purchase program is abnormal saying he opposes an extension of operation twist. the latest s&p case shiller index due later today is expected to show continued improvement for home prices in 20 major u.s. cities. providing further evidence of a long term rebound for the sector or sdw does it. our next guest is eric glean, chief of u.s. rates research and strategy at td securities. paul dale is also still with us. eric, good morning. first to you. tell us why you're concerned the housing recovery might not be for real. >> well, we have seen fits and starts in this recovery. i do think it is for really. we won't be seeing an upward move, but there are encouraging signs. we're seeing home prices improve across most regions of the company. inventories on a monthly basis are half of what they
or illusions of comedy or commercials. or cultures lows, the denominator of culture? of course. paris one resaw the super bowl the city buried in rubble than the manufacturer's brand your merges if a driver get out to congratulate each other while having the wisdom to purchase the truck and one survivor says have a twinkie [laughter] so there's the allusion to the american mass the urban legend taken from the schoolyard that twinkies have a shelf life of 10 million years. [laughter] would they buy the truck? to join the illusion that it is belonging. left ridicules the old days of things logical and if we were sufficiently intelligent all the age old prague court based -- problems was disappear. and how to refrain from its each other patriotism, a freedom of conscience and legal rights which anybody alleges my defense but now we are stymied because we don't know how to replace those practices so in a culture is improvised speak to no one at the airport drive 12 hours across the ocean and don't introduce yourself for talks on the elevator all in response to any suggestions and demand the one pow
of the problems for the greeks right now. they lost ground, but also want to show you what happened over in paris. the president of france kicking in the huge tax increases causing lots of problems in europe right now. finally over to london as you can see losing ground more than 1% loss in the london market. speaking of london, millions take to the street. the biggest protest yet, against the cutbacks of government-funded salaries and pension benefits. in london with the latest developments on all of this. >> so far london is quiet, although there are some that have been scheduled to happen in the latter part of the day. basically they're simply saying enough is enough. they feel the budget cuts are doing nothing from stymied growth. one processor so you have to leave something for the grandchildren but at this point there really is nothing. despite all the cuts, the economy will shrink 1.5% this year, predicted the airline just cut 4500 jobs in one of the major papers laying off a quarter of its staff. the government has stepped in to stop the evictions of people who can't pay mortgages after t
. >> the wide. >> the wide. >> the wide in paris, can restore them again? summer trees in bloom? when you chew upon sion where you stayed with a was just a baby? full text for ice cream. peace -- of course for you. even at 17, how sophisticated you were with your non-diploma trillion savage creature handsome vietnamese penpal writing your side, literary letters and schoolboy french. 19 e. eight or 59, wearing black armbands, still morning james dean. you and aren't sneaking cigarettes, having dusty piles of movie magazines under the bed. >> live in the cold come well ordered house of adult experience. >> a decade bus between us. my student years in chicago, london for nearly a song returning to this country in 73, a year in the ozarks for a history class. i've done while sipping black century houses, communal flat, antiwar marches, street theater theater theater in ark, northern california. for the usual drugs and fanciful sex, while you were at home, respect about cambridge five, reading a homer in the original as your toddler snapped. >> one eyed young children, i sought consolation, languag
donations from the american people down to peru. a week later she flew to paris at the mecca spano gonzalez, wife of the peruvian president and l-lima to deliver donations, visit the injured and homeless and review the damage. she took with her over 18,000 pounds of clothing, blankets and other goods as well as cash donations. during her brief stay, she accompanied on a tour of the most devastated region, flying on a small plane come sitting on the other repurposed kitchen chair with no seatbelt. walking amid the rubble she hugged children and offered comfort to those who have lost everything. her genuine concern and sympathy did much to ease the tension that existed between the u.s. and peru since the dissension to power an editorial depends, the main newspaper newspaper and noted the profound significance of past visits. enter human wants and identification the suffering of peruvian people come the editorial continued, she'd gone beyond the norms of our courtesy. the people of peru appreciated the understanding and concern she demonstrated in our sorrow. on her departure, awarded her the
journal" and the international "herald tribune" in hong kong, london, brussels, paris, atlanta and new york. he served as managing editor of the asian "wall street journal" and london bureau chief for the journal. he was a member of the team that won the distinguished business reporting award for articles about the sub-prime mortgage crisis and was also one of the reporters awarded the 2008 excellence in urban journalism award. he covered fannie and freddie for "the wall street journal" over the eventful years of 2004 to 2010, and now he has written a very insightful and instructive book, "the fateful history of fannie mae" which he will now discuss. we are delighted to have you here. [applause] >> thank you so much alex and thank you all for your interest in this topic. i think it's really appropriate that i present my book here, because they aei was so far in warning of the dangers of fannie and freddie. not the congress was really listening. [laughter] and it's a pleasure to be here and see so many people who kindly helped me over the years in my research, alex, tom, ed, tom staton,
died in a paris hospital almost exactly eight years ago after falling ill. his wife claimed he was a victim of polonium which can only be produced in lethal quantities by a state-run laboratory. a swiss lab found significant traces on arafat's underwear and toothbrush. his mausoleum screened from public view. three separatelyamples will be taken. the results of the investigation aren't expected for several months, but arafat's body will be immediately reburied with full military honors. not everybody is in favor of the exhumation. [ speaking in foreign language ] . >> reporter: palestinians are convinced israel is the culprit. what they really want to the know is who helped them? allen pizzey ramallah. >>> and former fbi assistant director joins us now. what do you make of this? >> this harkens back to the alexander case in london. the former kgb spy also poisoned with polonium 210. that was 2006. this was 2004. dropped in his tea by somebody he met at a hotel you and i have been to in the square. that also suggests if you look at the arafat case the amount of pr
to flee the country because of the high income tax increase. stephane has more in paris. as we look at some pictures, how has this gone down in the rest of france? are they viewing this as a criticism of the french tax system or of him? >> it's all about francois hollande. he explained the policy of the government, including fiscal policy. there's not much room for depardieu this morning. but it's not a big surprise. it's one less paying taxes in france as a result of the new tax policy implemented by the socialist government. it's a report from the belgium newspaper, which is reporting that gerard depardieu brought a property in a small village located just by the french border, and plans to escape the tax implemented by the government. the mayor of the village was unable to confirm that gerard depardieu bought a home in the village. it wouldn't be surprising, though, because this small village already has a 27% french population. it's not glamorous like london, geneva or even monaco, but it would be the place to pay less taxes and being close to french border. he earned two millio
," the paris review, the yale review, and elsewhere. she's been the recipient of the irish times prize for international fiction, the ray ya award for the short story. the oh henry award. and lane mom fellowship. it she's a member of the american academy of arts and letters, and gives me great pleasure to introduce laurie moore. ♪ >> the other member of this year's jury for the national book awards in fiction are daisy, -- and janet peer rei. [applause] [applause] why would the scene, reasonable, and brilliant people consent to the chore? one where you make a thousand enemies and maybe only one friend? one where your front porch fills up with packages, and your neighbors think you have a terrible lay night online shopping habit. [laughter] through the entire spring and summer. one does it for the champagne even it turns out to be a lot of peach stuff in it. [laughter] but one does it also to be part of a celebration of the deep mind mouth that is reading and how else is the human mind so fully and exquisitely read except through a piece of literary fiction? [applause] published by mc
liquid in the eurozone. moody's joined s&p by stripping paris of its aaa rating citing growing about public debt levels and its diminished ability to withstand future euro area shock. bank of japan remains steadfast despite rising political pressure prompted by controversial comments from the likely next prime minister who has called for an unlimited amount of cash. he wants benchmark rates to come in below zero. but the bank of japan governor has dismissed those ideas. the chief said negative interest rates will lig early liquidity concerns in the market martin schultz is with us. thanks for joining us. is this a sign of things to come, a big standoff with japan? >> well, it's rather surprising that a hopeful government coming in is picking a fight with the bank of japan when they're starting off. what is happening here is that it seems that the ldp doesn't really have a growth strategy right now and the frustration in industry with the strong yen and slowdown in export is tremendous about that. >> big problems if we have unfettered money printing. would there be as he also says 30
, for more on this extraordinary tale, stephane joined us now from paris. is this as intrusive as it sounds? >> they are increasing the pressure to keep these furnaces in the northeast of france. however, francois hollande did use the same words as the industry minister earlier this week. the french industry minister said he was no longer welcome in france because of years of broken promises with the government. yesterday evening when he met with the ceo of the company, francois hollande urged the company not to shut down the furnaces in the northeast of france. he raised the possibility to temporary nationalize these activities, and he also asked to continue the negotiations until the deadline, which is set on december 1st, to find a potential buyer for these furnaces, which in total employees more than 600 people. in the meantime, the mayor of london couldn't miss such an opportunity to mock the french governmen government,. calling them a red call left wing movement during the french revolution in 1789. >> the french minister has been so eccentric as to call for a massive investor to dep
. the first children's hospital was founded in 18 02 in paris. they've recognized then that children were not the same as adults. why are we ostriches and have our head in the stand? you could excuse it up until the end of the second world war. people went straight from school and work probably of the age of 14 and there was no choice. there was not at and between group. since the '50s, since all this, -- elvis, since my age group, what is the bloody excuse? [laughter] all i can say is, i think this is something you will do in your country very quickly, because what i love about america is the thing, we can do this, we will do it, we will make it work and we will donate. these are your teenagers. they need your support. they are your community and they are your future. you deserve to have it better. [applause] >> i just have one or two. what inspired you to set up the teenager and young adult cancer center? why there? >> mainly because i was doing a charity show and someone's back garden. rebecca was doing it for autism. and another teenage program. at that party dr. david feinberg, in c
'm coming from paris in new jersey. i work in staten island but yesterday going home i was very low on gas so i stop and then park first and after an hour and a half to two hours waiting, i got to the gas station, unfortunately out of gas, there was no more gas. >> reporter: so he was here this morning. now along with power outages at the retail station, there are also power outages at the storage terminals in new jersey so that means the gasoline that's in those terminals can't be delivered to the stations. in addition the port of new york and new jersey is closed so gas can't be imported through that port, it has to go through alternatives and trucked in. in order to provide some relief, governor chris christie has waived basically a rule that prevents gasoline stations here in new jersey from buying gas from out of state dealers so that should provide some relief for residents. nevertheless, the relief isn't expected to come any time soon. expect some gas lines for a few days to come. if there's any good news, prices here at the vince lombardi station are only about five cents above the
in jerusalem. again, you just returned from paris and you say much of the talk was about what's going on in the middle east. >> absolutely. the group i was with was john bolton and it was quite a group of the we were talking about the iranian group that wants to see regime change in iran. they've just been delisted. and the reality is that's an option that we should be talking about. there are three option. option number one is negotiate and do some kind of detante like question with the soviets. two, is military attacks. both of those are bad. the third is, let's see if you can get a different regime. after all, we have a different regime in egypt. we have a new one in libya. we're going to have a new one in syria. a lot of questions about what's going to replace them. in iran, you probably could replace them with a pretty solid pro-western government if you did the right things. >> brian: kind of encouraged that president obama said he does have words of support for israel. >> they're getting bombed every day. and it turns out this has been going on for some time of the two, three a
gaulle airport outside of paris. today an appeals court in france ruled that continental is not criminally liable of negligence or manslaughter. now, the ruling comes two years after another court ruled that couldn't nemts was responsible for that crash. >>> want to go back to dan rivers in london. i understand we have got a connection there. dan, you've got some more information on what is taking place. the judge ruling the final ruling and recommendation from his report regarding some of the british tabloids that got into some serious trouble from phone hacking all the way to essentially spying on the royal family and many others. what do we know? >> where he. basically this is a response to this sprawling phone hacking scandal in the u.k. which exposed the way that tabloid journalists were going about getting stories. not only doing things in a very underhand way. in many cases breaking the criminal law to get stories. hacking into the phones of celebrities, of sports stars, of politicians, even of murder victims and of the victims of terrorism. a broad range of victim
for the rest of us. >> reporter: in paris they voted with their palates piggott an obama burger against a romney omelette and the town in japan declared obama for obama and in kenya where obama's father is from women have been giving thai newborns, the latest michelle obama, brian obama. >> we are now extremely excited. we are happy. >> reporter: in a village of kogelo his step-grandmother sarah said he's worked hard. people on the rest of this planet celebrating their vote for ones they couldn't cast. world markets also responded positively this morning, and only hours after winning his next term, obama got his first order of foreign business courtesy of british prime minister david cameron saying he wants obama's help to do more to protect the people of syria, put more pressure on the assad regime and assist the rebels. savannah. >> just one in a long to-do list for the president. thanks, michelle. >>> coming up next, big issue in the election, jobs. how to find them no matter what your age. but first this is "today" on nbc. >>> we're back now at 8:44. this morning on "today's money,"
by 0.5% as is the cac in paris and germany. the dax is off by 0.8%. >>> back in the united states congress returns to session today, this is the lame duck session that is kicking off. legislators faced a seven-week deadline to reach agreement on scheduled tax hikes and budget cuts that threatened to send the u.s. economy off a fiscal cliff. eamon javers, can we expect much? >> the lame duck session does begin today, as you say, and we can expect a lot this week, we'll see a lot of activity, if not real deal making, starting today let me walk you through the schedule of what will happen. congress is back today and also we're going to see the president of the united states meeting with progressive and labor leaders over at the white house, that's today. tomorrow we're going to see the president meeting with business leaders over at the white house, and we're also going to see the president hosting a press conference in which he'll take questions from reporters, remember his statement last week he didn't take questions. he's going to take some questions tomorrow and of course on frid
like london and paris and frankfurt, and what's really important about being in those locations is it gives them an advantage over their competitors in that they're able to provide lower latency, able to provide a shorter distance from point a to point b for their customers. >> so that's something you like, and you've also been looking around at a pharmaceutical company in canada. what do you see there? >> yes, valiant pharmaceutical we think is a pretty interesting not your typical pharmaceutical company. when you think about a big pharma company you think about them spending a lot of money on r&d for drug development. that's not what valeant does. they're spending 3% instead of 20% on revenue. they're going out and they're finding interesting niche drugs and drug companies and acquiring them and they're cutting the expens expenses, plugging the drugs into their distribution and able to add a lot of shareholder value by doing that. >> so what first brought to you valeant? what made you find that company? >> we found it on a screen with our bottom up process we do a lot of scree
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